We Stand For Wildlife


Conservation in Uganda

Uganda is one of the richest countries in Africa for biodiversity conservation, ranking second richest for mammals (and 13th in the World), second for birds, and seventh for higher plants. This is because several major Biomes meet here, each with their associated fauna and flora. Uganda is also home to several species whose global range is mostly confined to Uganda, such as mountain gorillas, Rothschild giraffe, Uganda mangabey, and Nahan’s francolin. Several wetland areas are also protected under Uganda law and managed by Wetlands Division of the Ministry of Environment.with low population sizes or are declining in number. In order to do this we have to address many challenges that include poaching of wildlife,habitat loss to agriculture,  competing land uses and the recent oil developments in the country.This web site summarises what WCS Uganda is achieving with its partners and some of the key needs for conservation in this amazingly beautiful country.

WCS in Uganda

WCS has been supporting conservation in Uganda since 1957 and we have supported conservation projects almost every year since this time, making WCS the oldest organization supporting conservation in Uganda.
Much of our support has been to Ugandan scientists for conservation research.We supported conservation of Kibale Forest for many years during the insecurity of the 1970s and 1980s and established the Makerere University Biological Field Station in that forest. Our knowledge about the biodiversity of that forest and surveys we funded of Bwindi Impenetrable Forest led to the creation of both areas as National Parks in the early 1990s.

Our current focus in Uganda is on three key landscapes which are critical for conservation: Greater Virunga Landscape, Murchison-Semliki Landscape and the Kidepo Landscape. We also focus on several large mammal and bird species because these are species that are threatened with low population sizes or are declining in number. In order to do this we have  to address many challenges that include poaching of wildlife,habitat loss to agriculture,  competing land uses and the recent oil developments in the country. This   web  site summarises  what  WCS Uganda is achieving with its partners and some of the key needs for conservation in this amazingly beautiful country.



In the news

March 26, 2021

Success Story: Using Beekeeping to Address Human-Wildlife Conflict and Improve Community Livelihoods around Karuma Wildlife Reserve

As human populations grow, communities move into habitats, clearing land previously home to wildlife to make room for human settlement and agriculture […]
March 4, 2021

National Strategy to Combat Transnational Wildlife Crime, Anti-Poaching Launched: Multi-Sectoral Approach Needed to Protect Uganda Forests

The National Strategy to Combat Illegal Trade and Trafficking of Wildlife and Wildlife Products 2020-2029 developed by The Ministry of Tourism,[…]

January 5, 2021

Strengthening Uganda’s Law Enforcement Response to Wildlife Conservation

KAMPALA, Uganda: Wildlife Conservation Society (WCS) Country Director, Dr. Simon T. Nampindo delivered a lecture to 45 mid-level management police officers, including police [...]

December 17, 2020

Elephant Trench Reduces Crop Raids, Improves Community Livelihoods and Inspires Communities to Love Wildlife

Karegyesa Deo (40 years) is a subsistence farmer and wildlife conservationist. He lives with his extended family (his wife, 10 children, five grandchildren and three daughters-in-law) in Nyanga Subcounty that[...]

Publications

Email from:
 
Email to:
 
Message:


The person you email to will see the details you enter in the Form field and will be given you IP address for auditing purposes